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Ahhh, television. Waiting for your program guide to come out so you can work out when the ‘boring nights’ are on so you can catch up on homework. Scheduling late meetings or weekend events around the almighty will of the channel programmers.  Not knowing if tonights episode is actually a repeat, again, checking the Guide.

Chances are, if you are into TV for entertainment, or just love the documentaries, your life has been ruled more by the TV Guide then The Bible.

Now that all commerial and non-commercial ‘free-to-air’ (which now includes free-to-digital) stations have their online components set up, YOU CAN leave the Guide to those who feel the need to vote for the Logies, and take back your life!

What happens is – when a station buys the broadcasting rights to a program, they will (in most cases, though not all) buy the digital rights for a set period of time and make it available online.

Huzzah!

This means, if I miss the last episode of ‘Blood, Sweat & T-Shirts’ (which I did) I can hop onto iView (because it was on the ABC) and watch it up to a few weeks after it was aired.

This also means that shows with a large Geek following, such as ‘Doctor Who’ can be online days before it is actually broadcast on the ABC. (Yes, I watch a lot of ABC…)

Thirdly, if there is a series that will work better online then broadcast via the usual means, such as ABC’s new series ‘Bluebird’, they can chose to do that and not even screen it on ABC, ABC2 or ABC3 (the last two being digital channels).

What does this mean for teachers?

You might watch ‘Law & Disorder’ on SBS and decide the episode might be useful additional material for a topic you are covering in class – you then can either show the episdoe in class, or even give instructions for your students to view it on their own time before having a class discussion on the topic.

Very useful!

So who pays?

We do – in most cases the stations are either funded by the government, and therefore we pay in our taxes; or ‘advertising breaks’ are inserted into the online version, much the same as on regular commerical TV.

What technology do you need?

In most cases, you will already have everything to watch from a computer screen. If you want to watch from a standard TV, you can purchase a ‘computer to tv’ magic-box for around AUD$100 (here‘s the long and technical verion in an article).

Come to think of it… this also makes learning to program a VCR defunct… even better!

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I assure you, there is nothing wrong with me; I just want Apps.

This YouTube shows off the soon to be released Moodle4iPhone application to run Moodle courses through my iPhone. It isn’t a new skin or theme, it is an App, or a piece of software that you need on your iPhone that will display a Moodle course in a way that makes it easy to navigate and use many of the common Moodle-y tools.

Because it is an App, that means I won’t need to have people select the right skin, or clumbsily try and move around a page that was designed for 10 inch+ monitors on their little phone.

I’m too excited about this, and as soon as it is released I’ll be downloading the App and testing it out – then when I’m happy, I’ll bring my iPhone-using students over to use this fabulous new tool!

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site: Google Wave – wikipedia
site: About Google Wave – Google

clip: What is Google Wave? – epipho
clip: Google Wave Collaboration Tool – wwwinsanelygreatmac
clip: Google Wave Preview Review “Revolutionise Email”? – mobilephone2003


Yesterday I got my developers ‘sneak peak’ version of the long-promised Google Wave… I have to say that I like it a lot better than wiki for the tasks I’m thinking of using it for.

My first thought is to use this as a curriculum development tool – allowing SME‘s (Subject Matter Experts) and an Instructional Designer (or ID Coordinator) to get together and work synchronously or nonsynchronously on developing courses, units, reading materials, etc.

I can see potential in the future to write the use of this tool into assessments – specially for group work, but also perhaps a way of revising ‘how’ a doument was built (because of the ‘playback’ mode).

Will it kill email? – not convinced, but I can see that it would be a helpful tool in collaborative work. Still won’t be useful for emailing out my Christmas newsletter with pictures of my dogs.

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website: What does 21st century learning look like?

Education.au offers participants an exclusive opportunity to hear, discuss and debate with leading educators and technologists about 21st century learning.

The seminar provides an occasion for educators, academics, researchers, policy makers, curriculum designers, IT industry, digital media developers who represent a diversity of views and approaches, to meet and discuss the challenge.

The program for the day will feature speakers from technology companies and education sectors providing insight about:

* What does 21st century learning look like?
* What does it mean for our institutions and learning environments?
* How will 21st century learning impact on schooling, parents, the community, workplace and further education?

Panel discussions and opportunities from the audience to interact with speakers.

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article: Here’s Why You Need an E-Learning Portfolio

Here is an excellent article about e-Portfolios. It focuses more on keeping it up to date so that you have a ready-made CV of accomplishments, but that is just as important for teachers as it is for other professionals. As student-teachers, building a portfolio offline is important, but now having an e-Portfolio online is proving to be more flexible and always ready to show your accomplishments to anyone with an internet connection – and an interest. See the two YouTube clips in the last article for some more information about how powerful e-Portfolios can be for the individual and the organisation.

For networking, collaboration, and something to show off your skills – there is nothing to beat a good, well-thought out e-Portfolio, and this article will help guide you through the basic building blocks to create a great one.

Questions:
– Reading this article, do you feel as though you have a good understanding of -what- to use an e-Portfolio for?
– Work is being done into how to use e-Portfolios as part of assessment, think about how this might be used to assess project-based work.
– Do any of your associates use e-Portfolios? What ones do they use (Linked In and me.edu.au are popular free ePortfolios)?
– If you were to set aside a little time each week for professional development, could you start by setting up an e-Portfolio?

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article: “Grow-a-Moodle”

I found this experience facinating. For starters – its going a long way towards the student-centred style of learning, next, its using technology in an open setting, handing the reigns over to the students and letting them learn how to do things themselves. The experience of the teacher was that the students rarely used the instructional materials but threw themselves into ‘playing’ with the technology. This is very Digital Native.

Think about:

  • – what would need to be in place to do this experiment?
  • – how could you assess this sort of a project?
  • – what age/intelligence-types (such as Gardners) would find this project daunting?
  • – do you think that group work or personal work would be more effective?
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